Hancock, MA: history, population, rivers, lakes, mountains, resorts, hotels, motels, inns, and landmarks.
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Hancock, Massachusetts

Berkshire county. This is a mountainous township, on the line of the state of New York, the source of the Housatonick, and the residence of a family of "Shakers." It lies 129 miles W. from Boston, 15 N. by W. from Lenox, and 5 E. from New Lebanon, New York. Incorporated, 1776. Population, 1837, 975.

There are one cotton and three woolen mills in the town and some manufactures of leather, boots, shoes, iron castings, and wooden ware. The value of 5,445 fleeces of wool, sheared in 1837, amounted to $11,544.

As we are so near the lovely valley of New Lebanon, its tepid springs, and a large family of our friends, the Shakers, we must be permitted to cross the line a moment, "just to take a look."

New Lebanon, New York, is in the county of Columbia, and situated in a delightful valley, surrounded by cultivated hills, which present scenery greatly variegated and peculiarly pleasing.

A community of Shakers, of between 500 to 600, own about 3,000 acres of excellent land in this township, which is highly improved by this industrious, hospitable, and curious people. Their village is about two miles southeast of the springs.

The Springs are on the side of a hill, and are so abundant as to supply a small water power. The waters are tasteless, pure as crystal, and appear to differ in no respect from other pure mountainous waters, except in temperature, which is always at 72° of Fahrenheit.

This is a great resort for visitors from all directions:—some to enjoy the romantic scenery with which this region abounds, and others the benign influence of the waters. The public resorts are well located, and afford excellent accommodations. New Lebanon is 134 miles W. from Boston, 24 E. from Albany, 25 N.E. from Hudson, 7 W. from Pittsfield, 23 S. by W. from Williamstown, 156 N. by E. from New York, and 68 N.W. by W. from Hartford, Ct.


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