Phipsburgh, ME: population, rivers, lakes, mountains, resorts, hotels, motels, inns, and landmarks.
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Phipsburgh, Maine

Lincoln county. This is a maritime town at the mouth of Kennebec river, on the west side, 40 miles S. from Augusta and 18 S.W. from Wiscasset. Population, 1837, 1,430. It consists of a peninsula of land, of about 15 miles in length, and from two to four miles in width, lying between Kennebec river, on the east, and New Meadows, or Stevens' river, on the west, and extending from Small Point, the eastern boundary of Casco bay, to the town of Bath on the north. It contains a U.S. fort, and Seguin and Pond islands, on which are light houses.

Phipsburgh was taken from the ancient town of Bristol, in 1816, and named in honor of Governor Phips, who was born in Bristol.

Governor Phips lived in the wilderness of Maine till he was eighteen years of age, and was then an apprentice to a ship-carpenter four years. He went to Boston, and learned to read and write. He chose to seek his fortune on the sea, and had good luck to discover the wreck of a very valuable Spanish vessel on the coast of Hispaniola, and by the aid of the British government succeeded in fishing up plate, pearls and jewels, amounting in value to three hundred thousand pounds sterling, with which he sailed to England in 1687. He obtained by his enterprise sixteen thousand pounds and the honor of a knighthood. He returned to Boston in 1690, and commanded an expedition against Port Royal, which place he captured. When the new charter of Massachusetts was obtained he was appointed the first governor under it. He arrived at Boston, as governor, in 1692. In 1694, in a dispute with the collector of the port, Sir William so far forgot his dignity as to descend to blows. He was removed from office, and returned to England. He received assurance of being restored, but before that event happened he died, in 1695, aged 44.

Phipsburgh has considerable trade and navigation. Ship building is pursued, and fishing is a source of profit. There is no better site for fishing establishments on the coast. It is a very pleasant town and an agreeable location to court the sea breezes in summer.


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